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Safety and Efficacy of a Bodyweight Exercise Training Program in Symptomatic Patients With Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

Published:October 20, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2022.09.021
      Conventional exercise therapy including aerobic and resistance training is desirable for cardiovascular disease, whereas it is generally considered contraindicated for symptomatic severe aortic valve stenosis (AS). This study aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of bodyweight resistance exercise training (BRET), which is low-intensity exercise training in symptomatic patients with severe AS. A BRET program consisting of 8 exercises was performed 3 times a week by patients with AS with physical therapists. For the 78 symptomatic patients with severe AS, the median aortic valve area and mean transaortic valve pressure gradient were 0.56 cm2 and 48.9 mm Hg, respectively; none showed any harmful changes in blood pressure or heart rate in 11 sessions of the BRET program. There were no adverse events during hospitalization. Meanwhile, Barthel's Index score significantly improved at the time of hospital discharge. In conclusion, the BRET program in this study did not appear to cause harmful changes in hemodynamics during the program or adverse events during hospitalization, and it improved activities of daily living in symptomatic patients with severe AS, allowing doctors and physical therapists to conduct it safely, with less emotional stress, for cardiac rehabilitation for such patients.
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