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Cardiovascular Health Among Cancer Survivors. From the 2019 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey

      With increasing prevalence, there is a growing population living with cardiovascular (CV) disease and cancer who are concurrently or at risk for developing these 2 disease states. We examined CV conditions and CV risk factors in cancer survivors in a cross-sectional analysis, using data from the 2019 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Cancer survivors are more likely than participants without a cancer history to have multiple risk factors that increase their risk for CV disease and other chronic illnesses, including cigarette smoking, physical inactivity, and obesity. In contrast, cancer survivors are less likely to be heavy drinkers or to not consume fruits and vegetables. The odds of having a heart attack, coronary heart disease (CHD), diabetes, and hypertension were generally higher among cancer survivors. In multivariable analysis, the adjusted odds of having a heart attack, CHD, diabetes, hypertension, or high cholesterol were higher among cancer survivors than among participants without a history of cancer. Although the odds of obesity and physical inactivity were generally higher among cancer survivors across all socioeconomic status groups, the odds of having a heart attack or CHD were particularly high among Black and Hispanic cancer survivors and among younger participants. The odds of having diabetes were also higher among Black and Hispanic cancer survivors. In conclusion, cancer survivors are more likely than participants without a cancer history to have multiple risk factors that increase their risk of CV disease and other chronic illnesses, and they have a higher prevalence of heart attack, CHD, diabetes, and hypertension. Of particular concern are the higher prevalence of heart attack, CHD, and diabetes among Black and Hispanic cancer survivors.
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