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Technology to Help Promote Physical Activity

Published:September 29, 2016DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2016.09.025
      Aerobic exercise is one of the most effective interventions for enhancing cardiovascular and mental health, cardiorespiratory fitness, and quality of life. Regular exercise can prevent atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) and reduce associated risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes, and obesity.
      • Varghese T.
      • Schultz W.M.
      • McCue A.A.
      • Lambert C.T.
      • Sandesara P.B.
      • Eapen D.J.
      • Gordon N.F.
      • Franklin B.A.
      • Sperling L.S.
      Physical activity in the prevention of coronary heart disease: implications for the clinician.
      In addition, exercise is a proved treatment for depression and anxiety. In a recent “call to action” for a National Physical Activity Plan, the American Heart Association (AHA) highlighted a sedentary lifestyle as a leading cause of death worldwide.
      • Kraus W.E.
      • Bittner V.
      • Appel L.
      • Blair S.N.
      • Church T.
      • Després J.P.
      • Franklin B.A.
      • Miller T.D.
      • Pate R.R.
      • Taylor-Piliae R.E.
      • Vafiadis D.K.
      • Whitsel L.
      American Heart Association Physical Activity Committee of the Council on Lifestyle and Metabolic Health, Council on Clinical Cardiology, Council on Hypertension, and Council on Cardiovascular and Stroke Nursing
      The National Physical Activity Plan: a call to action from the American Heart Association: a science advisory from the American Heart Association.
      Accordingly, performing regular moderate-to-vigorous physical activity may be as important as decreasing blood pressure, serum cholesterol, body weight, and hemoglobin A1c in diabetics to reduce the risk of CVD. Moreover, it appears that being unfit warrants consideration as an independent risk factor and that a low level of cardiorespiratory fitness or aerobic capacity increases the risk of CVD to a greater extent than merely being physically inactive.
      • Williams P.T.
      Physical fitness and activity as separate heart disease risk factors: a meta-analysis.
      Health care providers as well as the entire clinical staff play an important role in recommending and promoting regular physical activity.
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