Advertisement

The Scimitar Syndrome Confirmed by 320-Slice Computerized Tomography

Published:December 12, 2011DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjcard.2011.10.037
      Scimitar syndrome is a relatively rare variety of congenital heart disease characterized by partial or complete anomalous pulmonary venous connection of the right lung into the inferior vena cava. There are virtually no reports of the use of 320-slice computed tomography in establishing the diagnosis. The investigators present a case of scimitar syndrome confirmed by 320-slice computed tomography.

      Case Presentation

      A 4-year-old female child was hospitalized for pneumonia. Physical examination disclosed normal sinus rhythm and normal results on auscultation. There was a small right hemithorax, decreased intensity of breath sounds on the right side, and occasional right-sided crepitations. Scimitar syndrome was demonstrated on 320-slice computed tomography (Figure 1) , and the diagnosis was confirmed on cardiothoracic surgery. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful.
      Figure thumbnail gr1
      Figure 1(a,b) Three-dimensional 320-slice computed tomographic images. (c) Horizontal plane. (d) Frontal plane.

      Comments

      Scimitar syndrome is a rare variety of congenital heart disease (0.5% to 1%)
      • Canter C.E.
      • Martin T.C.
      • Spray T.L.
      Scimitar syndrome in childhood.
      characterized by partial or total anomalous pulmonary venous connection (see Figure 1) of the right lung into the inferior vena cava. The syndrome usually presents as recurrent chest infection and/or exertional dyspnea. Pulmonary artery hypertension and hemoptysis are uncommon features of the syndrome.

      Reference

        • Canter C.E.
        • Martin T.C.
        • Spray T.L.
        Scimitar syndrome in childhood.
        Am J Cardiol. 1986; 58: 652-654