Advertisement

Donald Carey Harrison, MD: A Conversation With the Editor

        Don Harrison was born February 24, 1934, in Blount County, Alabama, located about halfway between Birmingham and Huntsville, and that is where he grew up. He graduated from Birmingham Southern College with a BS in chemistry in 1954 and from the University of Alabama School of Medicine in 1958. His internship and assistant residency in medicine were at the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital in Boston, and they were followed by a year of cardiology with Dr. Lewis Dexter. From 1961 to 1963, he was a clinical associate in the cardiology branch of the National Heart Institute in Bethesda, Maryland. In July 1963, he and his family moved to Palo Alto, California, were he was chief resident in medicine at Stanford University School of Medicine. Thereafter, he remained at Stanford, and in 1967, at age 32, he became chief of the division of cardiology. From 1972 until 1986 he was professor of medicine and the William G. Irwin Professor of Cardiology at Stanford University School of Medicine. He remained at Stanford until 1986, when he moved to Cincinnati as Senior Vice President and Provost for Health Affairs of the University of Cincinnati Medical Center and also as Professor of Medicine and Cardiology at the same university. In 2003, he retired from those positions but continues on a consultant status to that institution. During those 17 years while serving as the chief executive officer of the University of Cincinnati Medical Center and its affiliate relations, he also was a member of the university policy and planning committee, the final governing body for the university (Figure 1).
        Figure thumbnail gr1
        Figure 1DCH at the time of the interview. (Photo taken by WCR.)
        To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

        Purchase one-time access:

        Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
        One-time access price info
        • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
        • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

        Subscribe:

        Subscribe to American Journal of Cardiology
        Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
        Already an online subscriber? Sign in
        Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

        Best Publications by DCH as Selected by Him

        Books

          • Harrison D.C.
          Circulatory Effects and Clinical Uses of Beta-Adrenergic Blocking Drugs (monograph). Excerpta Medica, Amsterdam1972
          • Miller H.M.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Biomedical Electrode Technology. Academic Press, New York & London1974
          • Harrison D.C.
          (Dr. Harrison’s comment: This book, which summarized presentations made by investigators from all over the world on arrhythmias held at Stanford University in 1980, is still used as 1 of the major text books on arrhythmias. It resulted as a follow-up to a conference that had been held in Denmark approximately 10 years earlier, in which I had participated. I was the organizer of this meeting and edited the text book that resulted.)Cardiac Arrhythmias. GK Hall Medical Publishers, Boston1981

        Other Publications

          • Chidsey C.A.
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Braunwald E.
          Augmentation of the plasma norepinephrine response to exercise in patients with congestive heart failure.
          N Engl J Med. 1962; 267 (Dr. Harrison’s comment: In this article, we demonstrated the release of norepinephrine from the hearts of patients with congestive heart failure who were exercising. This represented some of the earliest work in understanding the hormonal responses of congestive heart failure in patients.): 650-654
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Chidsey C.A.
          • Goldman R.
          • Braunwald E.
          Relationship between the release and tissue depletion of norepinephrine from the heart by guanethidine and reserpine.
          Circ Res. 1963; 12 (Dr. Harrison’s comment: In this study, we demonstrated that drugs that were used to treat hypertension at that time had part of their action based upon the depletion of norepinephrine from the heart. This led to many other studies on how drugs that were used to treat hypertension really worked.): 256-263
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Chidsey C.A.
          • Braunwald E.
          Studies on the mechanism of action of metaraminol (aramine).
          Ann Intern Med. 1963; 59: 297-305
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Goldblatt A.
          • Braunwald E.
          Studies on cardiac dimensions in intact, unanaesthetized man. I.
          Circ Res. 1963; 13: 448-455
          • Goldblatt A.
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Glick G.
          • Braunwald E.
          Studies on cardiac dimensions in intact, unanaesthetized man. II.
          Circ Res. 1963; 13: 455-460
          • Braunwald E.
          • Goldblatt A.
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Mason D.T.
          Studies on cardiac dimensions in intact, unanaesthetized man. III.
          Circ Res. 1963; 13 (Dr. Harrison’s comment: These were physiologic studies that demonstrated cardiac function in unanesthetized patients. These studies were carried out by putting metal clips on the surface of the hearts during open heart surgery and studying their movements during a number of physiologic activities, such as respiration and exercise. These studies were carried out before echocardiography or quantitative angiography.): 460-467
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Sprouse J.H.
          • Morrow A.G.
          The antiarrhythmic properties of lidocaine and procaine amide.
          Circulation. 1963; 28 (Dr. Harrison’s comment: This is one of the articles of which I am most proud. Although it was known that lidocaine had membrane effects, its antiarryhythmic action had not really been demonstrated in patients. We demonstrated not only its antiarrhythmic properties but its electrophysiologic properties in the human heart in patients undergoing heart sugery. This led to the widespread use of lidocaine later as an antiarrythmic agent. Much of my subsequent work on antiarrythmic agents was stimulated by this early work at the NIH.): 486-491
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Braunwald E.
          • Glick G.
          • Mason D.T.
          • Chidsey C.A.
          • Ross Jr, J.
          Effects of beta adrenergic blockade on the circulation, with particular reference to observations in patients with hypertrophic subaortic stenosis.
          Circulation. 1964; 29: 84-98
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Coggins C.H.
          • Welland F.H.
          • Nelson S.
          Mushroom poisoning in five patients.
          Am J Med. 1965; 38: 787-792
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Griffin J.R.
          • Fiene T.J.
          Effects of beta-adrenergic blockade with propranolol in patients with atrial arrhythmias.
          N Engl J Med. 1965; 273 (Dr. Harrison’s comment: This was one of the earliest publications on the clinical use of beta blockers in the US. This paper helped me earn a promotion to an Assistant Professor at Stanford.): 410-415
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Griffin J.R.
          Metabolic and circulatory responses to selective adrenergic stimulation and blockade.
          Circulation. 1966; 34 (Dr. Harrison’s comment: This publication defined the metabolic and circulatory effects of β-adrenergic blockade with propranolol, the first clinically used β blocker in the US. It also stimulated me to write a book on the clinical research of several of our programs studying the adrenergic nervous system.): 218-225
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Kleiger R.E.
          • Merigan T.C.
          Action of isoproterenol on heart cells in tissue culture.
          Proc Soc Exp Biol Med. 1967; 124: 122-126
          • Gianelly R.E.
          • Goldman R.H.
          • Treister B.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Propranolol in patients with angina pectoris.
          Ann Intern Med. 1967; 67: 1216-1225
          • Gianelly R.
          • von der Groeben J.O.
          • Spivack A.P.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Effect of lidocaine on ventricular arrhythmias in patients with coronary heart disease.
          N Engl J Med. 1967; 277 (Dr. Harrison’s comment: This article was one of the first to use computers to quantitate arrhythmias in a coronary care unit and to utilize blood levels and pharmacokinetic studies of lidocaine as it affected the quantitation of arrhythmias. This again is one of my highlight papers, and one of which I am most proud. It was this paper than enhanced my world-wide reputation and allowed me to speak throughout the world. This served as the basis for using lidocaine for arrhythmias after myocardial infarction.): 1215-1219
          • Gianelly R.
          • Mugler F.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Prinzmetal’s variant of angina pectoris with only slight coronary atherosclerosis.
          Calif Med. 1968; 108: 129-131
          • Henry W.L.
          • Crouse L.
          • Stenson R.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Computer analysis of cardiac catheterization data.
          Am J Cardiol. 1968; 22 (Dr. Harrison comment: This was one of my first publications on the application of computers in cardiology. It carried out with excellent post-doctoral fellows who had experience with computers and from this we developed not only components for analyzing in an online fashion cardiac catheterization data but later ventricular function and echocardiographic interpretation. Most of the computer-based systems used today are just modifications of our work.): 696-705
          • Stinson E.B.
          • Dong Jr, E.
          • Schroeder J.S.
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Shumway N.E.
          Initial clinical experience with heart transplantation.
          Am J Cardiol. 1968; 22 (Dr. Harrison’s comment: While the field of cardiac transplantation was largely the domaine of Norm Shumway, I and my post-doctoral fellows were instrumental in continuing to study these patients and understand how the heart functioned when there was no autonomic innervation of the heart. This, of course, was very important for making the reputation of cardiac surgery at Stanford and also in cardiology.): 791-803
          • Popp R.L.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Ultrasound for the diagnosis of atrial tumor.
          In Med. 1969; 71: 785-787
          • Popp R.L.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Ultrasound in the diagnosis and evaluation of therapy of idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis.
          Circulation. 1969; 40: 905-914
          • Harrison D.C.
          New drugs in the treatment of angina.
          N Engl J Med. 1969; 280: 895-896
          • Finegan R.E.
          • Gianelly R.E.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Aortic stenosis in the elderly.
          N Engl J Med. 1969; 281: 1261-1264
          • Popp R.L.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Ultrasonic cardiac echography for determining stroke volume and valvular regurgitation.
          Circulation. 1970; 41 (Dr. Harrison’s comment: Together with Richard Popp, we were among the first to use quantitation in echocardiography. We used what was known of angiograms to study stroke volume and valvular regurgitation. With 2-dimensional echocardiography, later this became even more quantitative.): 493-502
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Kerber R.E.
          • Alderman E.L.
          Pharmacodynamics and clinical use of cardiovascular drugs following heart surgery.
          Am J Cardiol. 1970; 26: 385-393
          • Stenson R.E.
          • Constantino R.T.
          • Harrison D.C.
          The interrelationships of hepatic blood flows, cardiac output, and blood levels of lidocaine in man.
          Circulation. 1971; 43 (Dr. Harrison’s comment: This is one of the early studies that demonstrated the effects of cardiac output and hepatic blood flow on the metabolism of a drug such as lidocaine on which I had carried out many studies. This was really one of the early studies on pharmacokinetics with drugs and how cardiac function played a role.): 205-211
          • Graham A.F.
          • Schroeder J.S.
          • Daily P.O.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Clinical and hemodynamic studies in patients with homograft mitral valve replacement.
          Circulation. 1971; 44: 334-342
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Ridges J.D.
          • Sanders W.J.
          • Alderman E.L.
          • Fanton J.A.
          Real-time analysis of cardiac catheterization data using a computer system.
          Circulation. 1971; 44 (Dr. Harrison’s comment: This was one of our major publication on the use of computers in cardiology. The system which was developed for the cath labs still is widely used with very few changes in the original work that we did. It is being sold by many companies.): 709-718
          • Stenson R.E.
          • Crouse L.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Computer measurement of cardiac output by dye dilution.
          Cardiovasc Res. 1972; 6: 449
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Alderman E.L.
          The pharmacology and clinical use of lido-caine as an antiarrhythmic drug - 1972.
          Mod Treatm. 1972; 9: 139-175
          • Zener J.C.
          • Hancock E.W.
          • Shumway N.E.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Regression of extreme pulmonary hypertension following mitral valve surgery.
          Am J Cardiol. 1972; 30: 820-826
          • Alderman E.L.
          • Barry W.H.
          • Graham A.F.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Hemodynamic effects of morphine and pentazocine differ in cardiac patients.
          N Engl J Med. 1972; 287: 623-627
          • Alderman E.L.
          • Matlof H.J.
          • Wexler L.
          • Shumway N.E.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Results of direct coronary artery surgery for the treatment of angina pectoris.
          N Engl J Med. 1973; 288 (Dr. Harrison’s comment: This was a seminal paper demonstrating the effects of coronary bypass surgery on angina pectoris. We documented the physiologic and clinical effects and correlated them with increased coronary flow to ischemic segments of the heart.): 535-539
          • Cannom D.S.
          • Graham A.F.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Electrophysiologic studies in the denervated transplanted human heart.
          Circ Res. 1973; 32 (Dr. Harrison’s comment: In this paper, we were able to demonstrate the electrophysiologic effects of pacing and atropine in patients who had transplanted hearts and no autonomic innervation. This was really the beginning of an electrophysiology program at Stanford.): 268-278
          • Matloff H.J.
          • Zener J.C.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis and heart block: cycle-to-cycle variation as a function of alterations in preload and afterload.
          Am J Cardiol. 1973; 32: 719-722
          • Cannom D.S.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Detection of ventricular arrhythmias in real-time with a portable analog computer.
          Am J Cardiol. 1974; 33: 399-402
          • Zener J.C.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Changes in serum enzymes following intra-muscular lidocaine.
          Arch Intern Med. 1974; 134: 48
          • Graham A.F.
          • Miller D.C.
          • Stinson E.B.
          • Daily P.O.
          • Fogarty T.J.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Treatment of refractory life-threatening ventricular tachycardia by surgery.
          Am J Cardiol. 1974; 32: 909-912
          • Cannom D.S.
          • Miller D.C.
          • Shumway N.E.
          • Fogarty T.J.
          • Daily P.O.
          • Hu M.
          • Brown Jr, B.
          • Harrison D.C.
          The long-term follow-up of patients undergoing saphenous vein bypass surgery.
          Circulation. 1974; 49: 77-85
          • Graham A.F.
          • Rider A.K.
          • Caves P.K.
          • Stinson E.B.
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Shumway N.E.
          • Schroeder J.S.
          Acute rejection in the long-term cardiac transplant survivor.
          Circulation. 1974; 49 (Dr. Harrison’s comment: This was a major summary of the effects of acute rejection on cardiac transplant patients. This summarized >5 years of work for our program, which was then one of the only active ones in cardiac transplantation.): 361-366
          • Popp R.L.
          • Brown O.R.
          • Silverman J.F.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Echocardiographic abnormalities in the mitral valve prolapse syndrome.
          Circulation. 1974; 49: 428-433
          • Schroeder J.S.
          • Silverman J.F.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Right coronary arterial spasm causing Prinzmetal’s variant angina.
          Chest. 1974; 65 (Dr. Harrison’s comment: This was one of the first papers to demonstrate coronary spasm, and while it was published in a lesser known prestigious journal, it is frequently referred to as one of the early demonstrations of coronary spasms being important in variant angina pectoris.): 574-577
          • Goodman D.J.
          • Rossen R.
          • Holloway E.L.
          • Alderman E.L.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Effect of nitroprusside on left ventricular dynamics in mitral regurgitation.
          Circulation. 1974; 50 (Dr. Harrison’s comment: This was one of the earliest demonstrations that vasodilatation could alter valvular disease in patients with late stage heart failure. This concept has now been extended to many patients with congestive heart failure.): 1025-1032
          • Alderman E.L.
          • Coltart D.J.
          • Wettach G.E.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Coronary artery syndromes after sudden propranolol withdrawal.
          Ann Intern Med. 1974; 81: 625-627
          • Lopes M.G.
          • Spivack A.P.
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Schroeder J.S.
          Prognosis in coronary care unit non-infarction cases.
          J Am Coll Cardiol. 1974; 228: 1558-1562
          • Coltart D.J.
          • Berndt T.B.
          • Kernoff R.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Antiarrhythmic and circulatory effects of Astra W36095, a new lidocaine-like agent.
          Am J Cardiol. 1974; 34: 35-41
          • Collinsworth K.A.
          • Kalman S.N.
          • Harrison D.C.
          The clinical pharmacology of lidocaine as an antiarrhythmic drug.
          Circulation. 1974; 50: 1217-1230
          • Paaso B.T.
          • Harrison D.C.
          A new look at an old problem.
          Am J Med. 1975; 58 (Dr. Harrison’s comment: This paper and number 31 are among my publications that are the most quoted. We studied patients with mushroom poisoning and defined 3 clinical phases of which are still widely used today among lay publications and other scientific publications. For many years I was consulted by physicians who had patients with mushroom poisoning.): 505-509
          • Popp R.L.
          • Filly K.
          • Brown O.
          • Harrison D.C.
          The effect of transducer placement on echocardiographic left ventricular dimensions.
          Am J Cardiol. 1975; 35: 537-540
          • Lopes M.G.
          • Fitzgerald J.
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Schroeder J.S.
          Diagnosis and quantification of ambulatory arrhythmias using an improved RR interval plotting system.
          Am J Cardiol. 1975; 35: 816-823
          • Alderman E.L.
          • Davies R.O.
          • Crowley J.J.
          • Lopes M.G.
          • Brooker J.Z.
          • Friedman J.P.
          • Graham A.G.
          • Matlof H.M.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Dose response effectiveness of propranolol for the treatment of angina pectoris.
          Circulation. 1975; 54: 964-975
          • Cannom D.S.
          • Rider A.K.
          • Stinson E.B.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Electrophysiologic studies in the denervated transplanted human heart. II.
          Am J Cardiol. 1975; 36: 859-866
          • Ingham R.E.
          • Rossen R.M.
          • Goodman D.J.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Treadmill arrhythmias in patients with idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis.
          Chest. 1975; 68: 759-764
          • Bolen J.L.
          • Holloway E.L.
          • Zener J.C.
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Alderman E.L.
          Evaluation of left ventricular function in patients with aortic regurgitation using afterload stress.
          Circulation. 1976; 53: 132-139
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Fitzgerald J.W.
          • Winkle R.A.
          Ambulatory electrocardiography for diagnosis and treatment of cardiac arrhythmias.
          N Engl J Med. 1976; 294 (Dr. Harrison’s comment: This was an early use of ambulatory electrocardiography for studying and treating arrhythmias. For this, we used a computer to quantitate arrhythmias in 24 hour recordings in patients. This, I believe, is the first major publication on this subject.): 373-380
          • Winkle R.A.
          • Alderman E.L.
          • Fitzgerald J.W.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Treatment of recurrent symptomatic ventricular tachycardia.
          Ann Intern Med. 1976; 85: 1-7
          • Winkle R.A.
          • Meffin P.J.
          • Fitzgerald J.W.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Clinical efficacy and pharmacokinetics of a new orally effective anti-arrhythmic, tocainide.
          Circulation. 1976; 54: 884-889
          • Mason J.W.
          • Winkle R.A.
          • Rider A.K.
          • Stinson E.B.
          • Harrison D.C.
          The electrophysiologic effects of quinidine in the transplanted human heart.
          J Clin Invest. 1977; 59: 481-489
          • Berndt T.B.
          • Fitzgerald J.W.
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Schroeder J.S.
          Hemodynamic changes at the onset of spontaneous vs. pacing-induced angina.
          Am J Cardiol. 1977; 39: 784-788
          • Bristow M.R.
          • Schwartz H.D.
          • Binetti G.
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Daniels J.R.
          Ionized calcium and the heart.
          Circ Res. 1977; 41: 565-574
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Meffin P.J.
          • Winkle R.A.
          Clinical pharmacokinetics of anti-arrhythmic drugs.
          Progr Cardiovasc Dis. 1977; 20 (Dr. Harrison’s comment: This was a summary paper outlining my experience with a number of anti-arrhythmic drugs particularly relating their pharmacokinetics to their antiarrhythmic actions. This review paper outlined many years of my work in this field.): 217-242
          • Barry W.H.
          • Fairbank W.M.
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Lehrman K.L.
          • Malmivuo J.A.V.
          • Wikswo Jr, J.P.
          Measurement of the human heart vector.
          Science. 1977; 198: 1159-1162
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Meffin P.J.
          • Winkle R.A.
          Clinical pharmacology and anti-arrhythmic actions of tocainide.
          Br Heart J. 1978; 40: 83-87
          • Ricci D.R.
          • Orlick A.E.
          • Doherty P.W.
          • Cipriano P.R.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Reduction of coronary blood flow during coronary artery spasm occurring sponta-neously and after provocation by ergonovine maleate.
          Circulation. 1978; 57: 392-395
          • Winkle R.A.
          • Meffin P.J.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Long-term tocainide therapy for ventricular arrhythmias.
          Circulation. 1978; 57 (1018–1016)
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Fitzgerald J.W.
          • Winkle R.A.
          Contribution of ambulatory electrocardiographic monitoring to antiarrhythmic management.
          Am J Cardiol. 1978; 41: 996-1004
          • Bristow M.R.
          • Thompson P.D.
          • Martin R.P.
          • Mason J.W.
          • Billingham M.E.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Early anthracycline cardiotoxicity.
          Am J Med. 1978; 65: 823-832
          • Anderson J.L.
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Meffin P.J.
          • Winkle R.A.
          Antiarrhythmic drugs.
          Drugs. 1978; 15: 271-309
          • Meltzer R.S.
          • Woythaler J.N.
          • Buda A.J.
          • Griffin J.C.
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Martin R.P.
          • Popp R.L.
          Two-dimensional echocardiographic quantification of infarct size alteration by pharmacologic agents.
          Am J Cardiol. 1979; 44: 257-262
          • Sami M.
          • Mason J.W.
          • Peters F.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Clinical electrophysiologic effects of encainide, a newly developed antiarrhythmic agent.
          Am J Cardiol. 1979; 44: 526-532
          • Harrison D.C.
          Research related to noninvasive instrumentation.
          Circulation. 1979; 60: 1569-1574
          • Ginsburg R.
          • Bristow M.R.
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Stinson E.B.
          Studies with isolated human coronary arteries: Some general observations, potential mediators of spasm, role of calcium antagonists.
          Chest. 1980; 78: 180-186
          • Ginsburg R.
          • Bristow M.R.
          • Stinson E.B.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Histamine receptors in the human heart.
          Life Sciences. 1980; 26: 2245-2249
          • Sami M.
          • Kraemer H.
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Houston N.
          • Shimasaki C.
          • DeBusk R.F.
          A new method for evaluating antiarrhythmic drug efficacy.
          Circulation. 1980; 62: 1172-1179
          • Orlick A.E.
          • Ricci D.R.
          • Cipriano P.R.
          • Guthaner D.F.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Coronary hemodynamic effects of ergovine maleate in human subjects.
          Am J Cardiol. 1980; 45: 48-52
          • Baim D.S.
          • Rothman M.T.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Improved catheter for regional coronary sinus flow and metabolic studies.
          Am J Cardiol. 1980; 46: 997-1000
          • Schwartz J.B.
          • Jackson G.
          • Kates R.E.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Long-term benefit of cardioselective beta blockade with once-daily atenolol therapy in angina pectoris.
          Am Heart J. 1981; 101: 380-385
          • Kates R.E.
          • Keefe D.L.D.
          • Schwartz J.
          • Harapat S.
          • Kirsten E.B.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Verapamil disposition kinetics in chronic atrial fibrillation.
          Clin Pharmacol Ther. 1981; 30: 44-51
          • Sami M.
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Kraemer H.
          • Houston N.
          • Shimasaki C.
          • DeBusk R.F.
          Antiarrhythmic efficacy of encainide and quinidine.
          Am J Cardiol. 1981; 48: 147-156
          • Samuelsson R.G.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Electrophysiologic evaluation of encainide with use of monophasic action potential recording.
          Am J Cardiol. 1981; 48: 871-876
          • Kates R.E.
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Winkle R.A.
          Metabolite cumulation during long-term oral encainide administration.
          Clin Pharmacol Ther. 1982; 31: 427-432
          • Clusin W.T.
          • Bristow M.R.
          • Baim D.S.
          • Schroeder J.S.
          • Jaillon P.
          • Brett P.
          • Harrison D.C.
          The effects of diltiazem and reduced serum ionized calcium on ischemic ventricular fibrillation in the dog.
          Circ Res. 1982; 50: 518-526
          • Alderman E.L.
          • Hamilton K.K.
          • Silverman J.
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Sanders W.J.
          Ana-tomically flexible, computer-assisted reporting system for coronary angiography.
          Am J Cardiol. 1982; 49: 1208-1215
          • Clusin W.T.
          • Buchbinder M.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Calcium overload, “injury” current, and early ischaemic cardiac arrhythmias—a direct connection.
          Lancet. 1983; 308: 272-273
          • Hughes E.B.
          • Zeman H.D.
          • Campbell L.E.
          • Hofstadter R.
          • Meyer-Berkhout U.
          • Otis J.N.
          • Rolfe J.
          • Stone J.P.
          • Wilson S.
          • Rubenstein E.
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Kernoff R.S.
          • Thompson A.C.
          • Brown G.S.
          Application of synchrotron radiation to non-invasive angiography.
          Nucl Instr Methods. 1983; 208: 665-675
          • Effron M.K.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Fibronectin.
          Am J Cardiol. 1983; 52: 206-208
          • Rubenson D.
          • Griffin J.C.
          • Ford A.
          • Claude J.
          • Reitz B.
          • Knutti J.
          • Billingham M.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Telemetry of electrophysiologic variables from conscious dogs.
          Am Heart J. 1984; 107: 90-96
          • Harrison D.C.
          Is there a rational basis for the modified classification of antiarrhythmic drugs?.
          in: Morganroth J. Moore E.N. Cardiac Arrhythmias new Therapeutic Drugs and Devices. Martinus Nijhoff, Boston1985: 36-40
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Rapaport E.
          • Thibault G.E.(chairpersons)
          • et al.
          Workshop II: Cost containment issues in acute myocardial infarction and coronary management—points of view.
          Am J Cardiol. 1985; : 65C-69C
          • Harrison D.C.
          Antiarrhythmic drug classification: new science and practical applications.
          Am J Cardiol. 1985; 56: 185-187
          • Harrison D.C.
          • Kates R.E.
          • Q B.D.
          Relation of blood level and metabolites to the antiarrhythmic effectiveness of encainide.
          Am J Cardiol. 1986; 58: 66C-73C
        1. Harrison DC. Science for the 21st century: the coming biomedical revolution. “I: preparing for science in the 21st century (Harrison DC, Osterweis, M, and Rubin ER, eds.) The Association of Academic Health Centers, Washington, DC, 1991:3–9. (Dr. Harrison’s comment: As Chairman of the Board of the Association of Academic Health Centers, we sponsored conferences on the coming biomedical revolution. This was published as a monograph, and I think we early described what the next generations of research in medicine would be bringing to patient care.)

          • Harrison D.C.
          Counterpoint to the Sicilian gambit.
          Cardiovasc Res. 1992; 26: 566-567
          • Signorello L.B.
          • Kennedy J.A.
          • Richmond R.A.
          • Sieu K.L.
          • Blot W.J.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Self-reported quality of life and health among Bjork-Shiley convexo-concave prosthetic heart valve patients.
          J Heart Valve Dis. 2001; 2: 210-218
          • Blot W.J.
          • Ibrahim M.A.
          • Ivey T.D.
          • Acheson D.E.
          • Brookmeyer R.
          • Weyman A.
          • Defauw J.
          • Smith J.K.
          • Harrison D.C.
          Twenty-five year experience with the Bjork-Shiley Convexoconcave heart valve.
          Circulation. 2005; 111: 2850-2857