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Safety and efficacy of citrus aurantium for weight loss

  • Author Footnotes
    * The funding source had no role in the collection of data, interpretation of results, or preparation of this report.
    Stephen Bent
    Correspondence
    Dr. Bent's address is: San Francisco VA Medical Center, 111-A1, 4150 Clement Street, San Francisco, California 94121
    Footnotes
    * The funding source had no role in the collection of data, interpretation of results, or preparation of this report.
    Affiliations
    From the Osher Center for Integrative Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, California

    Department of Medicine, San Francisco VA Medical Center, San Francisco, California
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  • Amy Padula
    Affiliations
    Department of Medicine, San Francisco VA Medical Center, San Francisco, California
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  • John Neuhaus
    Affiliations
    Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of California, San Francsico, California
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  • Author Footnotes
    * The funding source had no role in the collection of data, interpretation of results, or preparation of this report.
      To examine the safety and efficacy of citrus aurantium, an herb now commonly used as a substitute for ephedra in dietary supplements marketed to promote weight loss, we conducted a systematic review. An extensive search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS, and the Cochrane Collaboration Database identified only 1 eligible randomized placebo controlled trial, which followed 20 patients for 6 weeks, demonstrated no statistically significant benefit for weight loss, and provided limited information about the safety of the herb.
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