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Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and post–myocardial infarction depression

      In their article examining the relation between serum lipoprotein levels and post–myocardial infarction (MI) depression, Strik, et al
      • Strik J.J.
      • Lousberg R.
      • Crijns H.J.
      • Maes M.
      • Honig A.
      Relation of levels of serum lipoproteins to depression after acute myocardial infarction.
      reported that lower levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol 1 month after an MI were associated at 3 months with major and/or minor depression and depressive symptoms as measured by the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) in 140 patients, most of whom were men. This inverse relation between LDL cholesterol levels and post–MI depression has not previously been reported and adds to previous reports of an inverse relation between LDL cholesterol and depression in other settings.
      • Aijanseppa S.
      • Kivinen P.
      • Helkala E.L.
      • Kivela S.L.
      • Tuomilehto J.
      • Nissinen A.
      Serum cholesterol and depressive symptoms in elderly Finnish men.
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      References

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        • Lousberg R.
        • Crijns H.J.
        • Maes M.
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        Relation of levels of serum lipoproteins to depression after acute myocardial infarction.
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        American Journal of CardiologyVol. 94Issue 4
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          With respect to the association of 1 and 3 months depression status and low-densitylipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, the comment is a very interesting and important one: on the diagnostic level only 3 of 18 patients with depression at 3 months were not depressed at 1 month. However, based on the BDI score, 18 of 46 patients with high BDI scores at 3 months did not score above the threshold of 10 at 1 month. Inherent to diagnostic criteria, the DSM-IV score is a dichotomous system, whereas the BDI results in a continuous variable.
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