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Comparison of high- and low-intensity exercise training early after acute myocardial infarction

  • James A. Blumenthal
    Correspondence
    Address for reprints: James A. Blumenthal, PhD, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3926, Durham, North Carolina 27710.
    Affiliations
    From the Departments of Psychiatry and Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, USA

    From the Department of Medicine, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston Salem, USA

    From the Department of Health Physical Education, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, North Carolina, USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • W.Jack Rejeski
    Affiliations
    From the Departments of Psychiatry and Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, USA

    From the Department of Medicine, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston Salem, USA

    From the Department of Health Physical Education, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, North Carolina, USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • Margaret Walsh-Riddle
    Affiliations
    From the Departments of Psychiatry and Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, USA

    From the Department of Medicine, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston Salem, USA

    From the Department of Health Physical Education, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, North Carolina, USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • Charles F. Emery
    Affiliations
    From the Departments of Psychiatry and Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, USA

    From the Department of Medicine, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston Salem, USA

    From the Department of Health Physical Education, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, North Carolina, USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • Henry Miller
    Affiliations
    From the Departments of Psychiatry and Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, USA

    From the Department of Medicine, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston Salem, USA

    From the Department of Health Physical Education, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, North Carolina, USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • Steven Roark
    Affiliations
    From the Departments of Psychiatry and Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, USA

    From the Department of Medicine, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston Salem, USA

    From the Department of Health Physical Education, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, North Carolina, USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • Paul M. Ribisl
    Affiliations
    From the Departments of Psychiatry and Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, USA

    From the Department of Medicine, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston Salem, USA

    From the Department of Health Physical Education, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, North Carolina, USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • Pamela B. Morris
    Affiliations
    From the Departments of Psychiatry and Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, USA

    From the Department of Medicine, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston Salem, USA

    From the Department of Health Physical Education, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, North Carolina, USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • Peter Brubaker
    Affiliations
    From the Departments of Psychiatry and Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, USA

    From the Department of Medicine, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston Salem, USA

    From the Department of Health Physical Education, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, North Carolina, USA
    Search for articles by this author
  • R.Sanders Williams
    Affiliations
    From the Departments of Psychiatry and Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, USA

    From the Department of Medicine, Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston Salem, USA

    From the Department of Health Physical Education, Wake Forest University, Winston Salem, North Carolina, USA
    Search for articles by this author
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      Abstract

      The effects of the intensity of exercise training on cardiorespiratory variables were investigated in a consecutive series of men with recent (median 8 weeks) acute myocardial infarction. Forty-five patients were randomly assigned either to a high-(65 to 75% maximum oxygen consumption rate [VO2max]) or to a low-intensity (<45% VO2max) exercise group. Patients engaged in medically supervised aerobic training 3 sessions a week for 12 weeks. With training, mean VO2max significantly increased by 11% (2.09 to 2.31 liters/min) within the high group and by 14% (1.93 to 2.21 liters /min) within the low group. Differences between groups were not statistically significant. Bom groups also had comparable changes in heart rate, blood pressure and double-product at submaximal and maximal workloads. Analysis of blood lipids revealed that both groups experienced a significant increase in high density lipoprotein cholesterol. There were no significant changes in total serum cholesterol or triglycerides. These findings suggest that within an unselected population of patients after acute myocardial infarction referred for cardiac rehabilitation, low- and high-intensity exercise training produces relatively similar changes in cardiorespiratory variables during the initial 3 months of exercise training.
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