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Effects of ionophore RO 2–2985 (X537A) on conscious dogs in experimentally induced hemorrhagic hypotension

Mortality, systemic pressure and renal and coronary blood flow
  • Henry G. Hanley
    Correspondence
    Present address and address for reprints: Henry G. Hanley, MD, Veterans Administration Hospital 111B, Lexington, Kentucky 40507.
    Affiliations
    From the Departments of Cell Biophysics, Medicine and Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine and Fondren-Brown Cardiovascular Research and Demonstration Center of The Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas USA
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  • Julie A. Swain
    Affiliations
    From the Departments of Cell Biophysics, Medicine and Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine and Fondren-Brown Cardiovascular Research and Demonstration Center of The Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas USA
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  • Craig J. Hartley
    Affiliations
    From the Departments of Cell Biophysics, Medicine and Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine and Fondren-Brown Cardiovascular Research and Demonstration Center of The Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas USA
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  • Robert M. Lewis
    Affiliations
    From the Departments of Cell Biophysics, Medicine and Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine and Fondren-Brown Cardiovascular Research and Demonstration Center of The Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas USA
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  • Frank Dunn
    Affiliations
    From the Departments of Cell Biophysics, Medicine and Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine and Fondren-Brown Cardiovascular Research and Demonstration Center of The Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas USA
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  • Arnold Schwartz
    Affiliations
    From the Departments of Cell Biophysics, Medicine and Surgery, Baylor College of Medicine and Fondren-Brown Cardiovascular Research and Demonstration Center of The Methodist Hospital, Houston, Texas USA
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      Abstract

      RO 2–2985, a potent inotropic agent, produces prolonged increases in left ventricular pressure and coronary and renal blood flow in conscious dogs. To evaluate these effects, 18 dogs were chronically instrumented with aortic or left ventricular pressure catheters, or both, and coronary and renal pulsed Doppler flow probes; 14 to 25 days later, after control values were recorded, sufficient blood was removed from each dog to reduce mean aortic pressure to 40 to 50 mm Hg or left ventricular pressure to 50 to 65 mm Hg during a 15 minute period. This pressure was maintained by withdrawal or addition of blood as necessary for an additional 30 minutes. The animals were then separated into two groups; one group was given RO 2–2985, the other an equivalent amount of drug solvent. Measurements were then made for 75 minutes or until death occurred. Retransfusion was performed in those animals living at 75 minutes. All 10 animals that received RO 2–2985 lived. After the drug injection, blood pressure and coronary and renal blood flow increased. Only one of eight animals receiving the solvent alone lived. The remaining control animals showed progressive deterioration in pressure and flow until death. The data show that RO 2–2985 decreased mortality and increased blood flow in the coronary and renal beds during hemorrhage-induced hypotension.
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