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Rauwolfia and guanethidine: Pharmacology and clinical use in treatment of hypertension

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      Abstract

      Both reserpine and guanethidine appear to utilize the same fundamental pharmacological mode of action which leads to depletion of tissue catecholamines.
      Guanethidine produces effects on the blood pressure similar to those of the ganglion-blocking agents without the troublesome side effects. It is an extremely potent agent, however, and is likely to produce symptoms attributable to postural hypotension.
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